An Interview with Rob Bell

Skye Jethani of Christianity Today got to interview Rob Bell again recently. I’ve always shared some affinity for Rob, both in our shared Fuller heritage and in the way that he loves to re-frame thoughts and notions that we’ve become desensitized to in ways that challenge us and stir us up again.

Here’s a great quote from the interview, which pertains particularly to our church’s current Mustard Seeds series:

Stop using the word ‘missionary’ and stop sending people out to the ‘mission field.’ Or keep the word, but also commission public school teachers, and dentists, and CPA’s, and construction workers, and those people who take your money at the toll booth. We’re all disciples, all ground is holy, every interaction and conversation is loaded with divine potential, anytime, anywhere. Ordain everyone, call everyone a minister, invite the whole church to be on staff.

You can read the full interview here.

I get a mention in Christianity Today

… well, in their weekly Political Advocacy Tracker.

Also from Sojourners: Justin Fung discussed this week’s ABC story on a weapons manufacturer that inscribed citations to Bible verses on gun-sights it made for the U.S. military. Justin Fung wrote on Sojourners’ God’s Politics blog, “It’s absolutely mind-boggling to me that carved onto weapons of war are words of truth and peace—words from a man who embodied and heralded a kingdom characterized by peace, and from a man who announced an alternative to empire and spoke of faith, hope, joy, gentleness, goodness, and peace. How in the heck do these things go together?” On Thursday, the company announced that it would cease the practice.

Apart from the misspelling, I’m humbled by the mention and encouraged by the quick and responsible action taken by Trijicon. That said, the phrasing makes it sound like I was much more responsible for the company’s action than I was.

By the grace of God, my voice was only one of thousands raised in protest, and credit belongs to everyone who stood up for their faith in the Prince of Peace.

UPDATE: Misspelling corrected, thanks to the editors of CT. 🙂